Photo Culture #12: Sebastiao Salgado

In the mid-1980s, the Brazilian photographer Sebastiao Salgado made an extraordinary reportage on the Sierra Pelada gold mine in Brazil. Since the first gold was found in the quarry, there has been a continuous coming and going of men who left their lands to work in the mine, hoping to find a gold nugget. And so, every day, an enormous number of people went up and down the precarious ladders in the quarry, dozens of times a day, carrying bags of mud weighing 60 kilos, in which they looked for even the smallest trace of precious metal. One of the most incredible and powerful reportage ever made in the history of photography.

Photo Culture #6: Robert Frank

In 1955 a young Swiss photographer, Robert Frank, obtains a scholarship from the Guggenheim Foundation to carry out a photographic work about United States. Frank will travel the length and breadth of the country, touching 48 different states between 1955 and 1956. The streets, the faces of the people he meets, the city squares, the bars and shops, the sidewalks, the most insignificant details pass and stop in front of the photographer’s lens. The result will be “The Americans”, a book that consecrates its author as a master in the history of photography. The volume represents a true “poem in images” dedicated to the American road (it’s no coincidence that the preface of the book was entrusted to Jack Kerouac); a reportage that, like few others, has truly marked an era, becoming for generations of photographers the main reference for taking pictures and travel, to know and learn with a glance. This image, among many featured in the book, was taken in Idaho.

Photo Culture #5: Gordon Parks

Maybe the most emblematic image took by African-American photographer Gordon Parks. It was taken in Alabama, in 1956, in front of a shopping mall. First African-American contributor to Life magazine, Parks told the world how was being black in a racist society. His photos are famous for their powerful cinematic style and for his ability to tell the story of a community through the eyes of someone who knows its difficulties.

Roma Coast to Coast 2022 – Mura Aureliane

Here we are. I talked a lot about my new Roma Coast to Coast, so you already know everything. Now the gallery is finally ready, so there’s nothing else to say, I just have to show you the pictures. I enjoyed this walk very much and I hope you will enjoy it too. Here I’ll show you just a selection, the entire reportage (98 photos) for now is only on my Facebook page. This is the result of a 20km walk along the ancient Aurelian Walls: do you like it?

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Roma Coast to Coast – Linea A

On April 21, 2015, I walked for 21 kilometers following the route of the Metro Line A, from Battistini to Anagnina. It was my first “Roma Coast to Coast”, the beginning of a series that I would continue several times in the following years. The aim was a photographic project to tell the various nuances of Rome. During the walk I wrote some notes. The notes are of a few lines, but collected and put together they make up a story that is fragmented, perhaps confused, but which somehow gives the idea of that beautiful day on the streets of my city. So, 7 years after that walking photographic journey, here is the diary of my first “Roma Coast to Coast”, a project that I dedicated to the memory of a former primary school classmate, Leonardo, who loved this city very much and who passed away exactly that day.

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-3 Days To My Next Roma Coast to Coast!

Since 2015 I did five reportage walking through Rome. The first, the most important, was about the Linea A of the Roman subway (I walked for 21km, taking pictures along the same way, but in surface, of the subway). Now my Coast to Coast series is ready for be back, after three years. I’m going to walk for 19km along the ancient Aurelian Walls, the old city walls that surround the historical centre of Rome. Built between 270 and 275 at the behest of Emperor Aurelian, the Walls were supposed to defend Rome from the threat of invasion by the Germanic populations. The Aurelian Walls, today, are an integral part of the daily life of those who live in Rome and are witnesses of the changes that the city has gone through in almost 2000 years. In this photographic journey of the “Roma Coast to Coast” series, I’ll walk along the city walls (both the visible and the no longer existing ones), touching the 18 gates that made up the original Walls: some gates are closed today , others were replaced, others are still there to observe the life of the city. A circular journey that will start at Porta San Paolo, alongside the Pyramid of Cestius, and will cross Testaccio and Trastevere, skirting the Tiber up to Piazza del Popolo, then Piazza Fiume, San Lorenzo, San Giovanni and many other historical glimpses of the capital. A photographic journey to tell a different Rome, a different way to know it better.

You can follow my walk on Instagram stories (I’ll do some update occasionally) and in the very next days you can watch the gallery with this new reportage on my Facebook page (and later on my website).

Photography and Other Stuff – Chapter 4

Welcome in a new chapter of PAOS (Photography And Other Stuff). I’m still in the Southern Italy, in Monopoli, and I spent part of my last week at home with an unexpected host: the f***ing Corona! I’m ok and I’m waiting to be negative in the next few days. I had the chance to take some pictures in these boring days and translate my feelings in photography: a nice experiment. Before this strange week I went to a town I never been before, Noci, where I took a couple of pictures. Next weekend, if I’ll be negative as I believe, I’ll be in Roma again for a wedding, but next time I’ll write to you I’ll already be in Monopoli again.
And you? How was your week? Feel free to write me your personal PAOS in the comments, I’d like to see this little space as a open forum with a free exchange of ideas and experiences.
Before I let you read more, I close the introduction with this photo I took today downstairs, when I made a little walk to move my bones.

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“Train Moments” by Dina Alfasi

I love to observe people on public transportations, I think they represent the real soul of a city, with their thoughts, their worries, their dreams. Israeli photographer Dina Alfasi, who works in hospital as engineer, takes bus and train to go to work and captures candid images of people around her. As she said: “I’m inspired by the little moments that happen every day. My work is a testament to telling stories through a single photo and proof that all you need is just to look around to find magic moments”. Her photos are just amazing, all taken with an iPhone. Follow Dina’s work on Instagram.

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